About us > Our People > Academic Staff > Dr Allen CHEONG
Our People
Dr Henry CHAN | Dr Allen CHEONG | Prof. Pauline CHO | Dr Chi-wai DO | Dr Chea-su KEE | Prof. Carly LAM | Dr Andrew LAM | Dr Thomas LAM | Dr Tina LIAN | Dr Bin LIN | Dr Larry NG | Dr Feng PAN | Dr Patrick TING | Prof. Chi-ho TO | Dr Dennis TSE | Prof. George WOO | Prof. Maurice YAP

Dr Allen CHEONG

Dr Allen Ming-Yan CHEONG
BSc PhD
Associate Professor

ORCiD 0000-0002-6746-3902
Author ID (Scopus) 7003847650

Biographical Sketch

Dr Allen Cheong received her Bachelor's degree in Optometry with first class honours from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She continued her graduate training in the area of low vision at the School of Optometry in Queensland University of Technology under the advisement of Prof. Jan Lovie-Kitchin. Her graduate research was focused on vision rehabilitation and optometric care for low vision patients, in particular their reading performance. Upon receiving her PhD, she conducted her postdoctoral work with Dr Duane Geruschat at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University in the area of mobility performance in low vision patients. After a year of postdoctoral training, she joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota as a research associate continuing her research work in low vision reading and mobility. In September 2008, she joined the School of Optometry at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University as an Assistant Professor. In July 2015, she was promoted to Associate Professor.

Dr Cheong has won several awards. Examples are: the Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) Foundation / Pauline and Oswald Lapp Travel Grants Awards, Atwell Award of Low Vision Research Group in ARVO, and the International Postgraduate Research Award from Queensland University of Technology. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry.

Her research interests are focused on the psychophysical, behavioural, and clinical aspects of ageing and low vision research with specialization in two activities – reading and mobility. Her major research goals are: 1) to improve the understanding of the impact of visual ageing and impairment on the performance of real-world visual tasks; 2) to apply research findings in clinical management for senior patients; and 3) to set up cost-effective rehabilitation models to improve the visual function of the low vision population. Other areas of her interests include letter and object recognition, visual crowding, and image analysis.